FRR Audiobooks: The Infernal Desire Machines of Dr. Hoffman

  • Posted on: 26 June 2017
  • By: rydra wrong

Link to audio: http://freeradicalradio.net/the-infernal-desire-machines-of-dr-hoffman-b...

In “The Realm Where Moral Judgement is Suspended” Milan Kundera writes that “If I were asked the most common cause of misunderstanding between my readers and me, I would not hesitate: humor.” There are books that make us laugh and books that make us laugh at ourselves, and I prefer the ones that do both. In The Infernal Desire Machines of Dr. Hoffman Angela Carter carries a dark laughter as the current flowing beneath the wild seas of her imagination and machinations. To actually read we must suspend moral judgement, we must suspend our notion of reality, and open ourselves to the possible.

Return to Post-Anarchism

  • Posted on: 25 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Ding Politik

I believe that scholars of anarchist theory have misunderstood the innovation of post-anarchist theory. Post-anarchism began as a critique of some of the presuppositions of traditional anarchist thought, specifically its ontological and epistemological positions. It was at its most powerful when it critiqued these assumptions. Its secondary benefit was to offer new possibilities for thinking anarchist ontology and, consequently, politics. Those who promote post-anarchist scholarship for only its secondary benefit therefore miss the important ‘break’ that it introduced into traditional theory. It is the break – or what Lacanians refer to as the ‘interpretative cut’ – that was most important, and not its secondary ontological and epistemological position.

D.C. cops used ‘rape as punishment’ after Inauguration Day mass arrests, lawsuit says

  • Posted on: 25 June 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Wide array of unconstitutional tactics alleged in suit over chilling round-up that hit peaceful protesters, journalists, and anarchists alike.

When black-clad marchers began smashing windows in Washington, D.C., on Inauguration Day, the city’s police force — reputedly the best in the country at upholding protesters’ rights during disruptive demonstrations — went nuclear.

June 11th reportback from Plain Words

  • Posted on: 22 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

via Plain Words in Bloomington. Please visit the source to see some nice pictures of these actions!

We receive and transmit:

In the month leading up to the June 11th International Day of Solidarity with Marius Mason & All Long-Term Anarchist Prisoners, we set up two tables at Boxcar Books with an array of free zines, stickers, and posters for June 11th and about anarchist prisoners.

A Response to “Beyond Bash the Fash”

  • Posted on: 22 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

originally published on It's Going Down

This is a response to the IGD podcast, “Beyond Bash the Fash.” I want to state clearly that I encourage people to listen to the podcast and I not only enjoyed the discussion which I felt was done in good faith, but took away a lot from it. The discussion itself is an important one, and having critical reflections about our activity is needed. Despite certain things in the discussion that were said that I disagreed with, overall I thought that those talking were generally respectful of people putting themselves on the front lines and risking life and limb to confront the far-Right, and that their points of critique should be viewed as part of an ongoing conversation, not a line in the sand

[J11] Thessaloniki, Greece: Responsibility claim for placement of incendiary device

  • Posted on: 22 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

We perceive anarchist and antiauthoritarian spaces as structures in which we organize struggles and live collective moments outside the authoritarian relations that the State and capitalism would like to impose on us daily.

Lately, the State has carried out various attacks against squats and hangouts in Athens, Thessaloniki, Agrinio and Larissa [see this article for more context].

A Student Strike Becomes an Occupation, for 17 Years

  • Posted on: 20 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From The New York Times
MEXICO CITY — Exams are over and classrooms have gone dark as summer comes to the National Autonomous University of Mexico, the pride of the country’s public education system.

But as students and professors melt away, there remains one strange and lively corner of the university’s main campus where nothing much will change, where tomorrow will be a lot like yesterday, and next month a lot like this one.

Since 2000, the university’s Justo Sierra Auditorium has been commandeered by political protesters, making it one of the longest-running occupations of a university building in history and putting more famous college takeovers to shame.

Pages