Essays

Return to Post-Anarchism

  • Posted on: 25 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Ding Politik

I believe that scholars of anarchist theory have misunderstood the innovation of post-anarchist theory. Post-anarchism began as a critique of some of the presuppositions of traditional anarchist thought, specifically its ontological and epistemological positions. It was at its most powerful when it critiqued these assumptions. Its secondary benefit was to offer new possibilities for thinking anarchist ontology and, consequently, politics. Those who promote post-anarchist scholarship for only its secondary benefit therefore miss the important ‘break’ that it introduced into traditional theory. It is the break – or what Lacanians refer to as the ‘interpretative cut’ – that was most important, and not its secondary ontological and epistemological position.

A Response to “Beyond Bash the Fash”

  • Posted on: 22 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

originally published on It's Going Down

This is a response to the IGD podcast, “Beyond Bash the Fash.” I want to state clearly that I encourage people to listen to the podcast and I not only enjoyed the discussion which I felt was done in good faith, but took away a lot from it. The discussion itself is an important one, and having critical reflections about our activity is needed. Despite certain things in the discussion that were said that I disagreed with, overall I thought that those talking were generally respectful of people putting themselves on the front lines and risking life and limb to confront the far-Right, and that their points of critique should be viewed as part of an ongoing conversation, not a line in the sand

An Attack on All of Us

  • Posted on: 15 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

How the Right Hopes to Use the Shooting in Alexandria

Those who wish to carry out acts of violence always seek to frame themselves as victims. If they are perceived as victims, this can legitimize the violence they perpetrate, or at least distract from it. So it was a godsend for the far right when James Hodgkinson opened fire in Alexandria on June 14, wounding House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and four other people. It gave them a chance to turn the story around: suddenly “Leftists” were the violent ones. Never mind the millions imprisoned and deported under Scalise’s governance, never mind the police murdering a thousand people a year, never mind the Republicans’ effort to deny tens of millions access to health care, never mind the white supremacist mass murders and stabbings and threats all around the US—those are so normalized as to barely warrant a mention. Yet a single shooting and a Shakespeare production, and suddenly everyone wants to talk about “left-wing violence.”

The First International and the Development of Anarchism and Marxism

  • Posted on: 15 June 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From Anarkismo by Wayne Price

Anarchism originated in the 1st International, through the Marx-Bakunin split.

There are recent histories of the First International researched from anarchist perspectives, which balance the dominant Marxist narrative. Both sides had their strengths and weaknesses, but overall the anarchists had the better program.

Anarchy Vs Yoga

  • Posted on: 14 June 2017
  • By: Fauve Noir

Have we just got gently fucked by Yoga, and its evermore affluent soft power?

The biggest and most successful cult these days, next to Capital of course, is Yoga. Yoga isn't only practice, but religion on its own... carrying a set of values, behavioral principles, representations about the Self and the Other, and also a very obvious set of metaphysical beliefs.

Now and the anarchy of destituent power: Reading politics with the invisible committee

  • Posted on: 11 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Autonomies

What follows is a second exercise in the sharing of ideas, of visions. The most recent essay by the invisible committee, Now, continues a reflection-intervention that began with The Coming Insurrection and To Our Friends, and offers a powerful critique of contemporary politics, along with a defense of “autonomy”. What is proposed here then is again a partial summary and a critical commentary of the idea of politics expressed in the essay.

An Introduction to the Affinity Group

  • Posted on: 8 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Plain Words

From 1890’s Spain to present day Bloomington, anarchists of varying stripes organize ourselves and take action together in what’s called an “affinity group.” Central to anarchy is not only respect for autonomy, but the belief that without stifling systems of control, people are capable of creativity, beauty, and courage. Because it is flexible, leaderless, and informal, the affinity group is one way to facilitate these drives.

Who Are the Anarchists and What is Anarchism?

  • Posted on: 8 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Black Rose Anarchist Federation By Thomas Giovanni

In the wake of the use of militant street tactics at the Trump inauguration protests, the controversial shut down of two prominent right-wing speakers the University in California, Berkeley, and a variety of high profile actions against the far right, anarchists have received increased media attention and sparked widespread debate, particularly around anti-fascist struggles. But many people are still confused about anarchism, associating it with indiscriminate violence, chaos, and disorder. This distorted image runs counter to more than a century of anarchist activity in and outside the United States. So if not chaos or disorder, what does anarchism stand for? What do anarchists believe in?

Review of Jonathan Matthew Smucker, Hegemony How-To: A Roadmap for Radicals

  • Posted on: 5 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Alpine Anarchist

Review of
Jonathan Matthew Smucker, Hegemony How-To: A Roadmap for Radicals (Chico et al.: AK Press, 2017)

There is much to admire in Jonathan Matthew Smucker’s Hegemony How-To: A Roadmap for Radicals. It adds another layer to the internal criticism of activist culture that we have seen in releases such as Matthew Wilson’s Rules Without Rulers: The Possibilities and Limits of Anarchism, J. Moufawad-Paul’s The Communist Necessity, and AAP’s Revolution Is More Than a Word: 23 Theses on Anarchism.

Pages