The Brilliant podcast: Episode 31 - Isaac Cronin I

  • Posted on: 3 September 2016
  • By: aragorn

From The Brilliant

This is the first in what is intended to be a year long series of interviews with an elder in the kind of politics that inform this podcast. Isaac Cronin is a writer, editor, and videographer (of sorts) who has published several books under the LBC imprint Cruel Hospice and who we have been friends with for several years.

This discussion was intended to lead off the rest of the interviews by speaking to today's problems with a post-situationist perspective. It's unclear how well it did that but it does introduce themes we'll be getting into including Jean-Pierre Voyer, James Carr, Berkeley history, FSM, Contradiction, The Council for the Eruption of the Marvelous, Call it Sleep, etc, etc. We'll also talk quite a bit about marketing and how to reconcile that with radical ideas (that oppose it).

The next section of our interview series has already been recorded. It'll be episode 35.

Links
Articles from the Council for the Eruption of the Marvelous
Call it Sleep
Cruel Hospice
James Carr

category: 

Comments

I liked this interview very much, and that it somehow got round to Baudrillard at the end.
Not that anyone knows or reads him, but like poetry, it seems like a collector's
discourse (Benjamin). Small note about the feminism involved in Situationism (or lack thereof)
is also perhaps a critique of the Brilliant, where no feminine or differently gendered voice
asks the questions.

I had thought post-Situationist discourse had disappeared forever,
finding its final resting place in the academy or IAS, which almost guarantees irrelevance.
Podcast seems more accessible, and I wonder why there are so few feminine/differently
gendered voices. Deleuze's point that the academy is becoming the new monastery refuge
for western culture (with its hermetic aspect) seems apropos. Also gendered (M). (with a few
exceptions).

ttfn

Deleuze was first and foremost one of the biggest contributors to this academic monastery, so it's almost tongue-in-cheek to make him its opponent. Deleuze WAS and still remains the typical academic guru of a portion of the radical Left.

Also there was never such a thing as "Situationism" just for the info. There was only the Situationists, it was just a gang of radicals, and the gangs that followed were quite shitty posers. Though the Situationist critique and theory is a thing.

Deleuze was first and foremost one of the biggest contributors to this academic monastery, so it's almost tongue-in-cheek to make him its opponent. Deleuze WAS and still remains the typical academic guru of a portion of the radical Left.

Also there was never such a thing as "Situationism" just for the info. There was only the Situationists, it was just a gang of radicals, and the gangs that followed were quite shitty posers. Though the Situationist critique and theory is a thing.

probably because this is an educated Western middle class friendly interest, so like the episode was saying autodidacts exist, but you'll mostly get people that fawn the developments from the Ivory Towers before they care about anarchist stuff. So yeah, it is probably never going to be attractive to subversive classes until something changes.

If episodes 32 and beyond are going to be as interesting as 31, I am all in.

Thanks for bringing back Siskel & Ebert. I've missed them.

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
CAPTCHA
Human?
z
U
4
t
B
1
P
Enter the code without spaces.