Bolivanarchism: The Venezuela Question in the USA anarchist Movement

  • Posted on: 24 June 2005
  • By: worker

Nachie - Red & Anarchist Action Network Friday, Jun 24 2005, 12:05am

A US anarchist analysis of Venezula

In the past several months we have noticed a growing curiosity over developments in the South American country of Venezuela. Everywhere in our day-to-day projects, people are talking and asking about the populist government of Hugo Chavez and his self-proclaimed “Bolivarian Revolution�. However, we became particularly concerned in noticing no corresponding increase in anarchist knowledge of the situation

THE EU IS DEAD. SHORT LIVE THE EU.

  • Posted on: 23 June 2005
  • By: worker

THE EU IS DEAD. SHORT LIVE THE EU.

By Thierry Marignac

Frog The Vote

My anarchist credo states that voting is an act of submission to the state. Not that I don't bow to the Rule of Law on a daily basis, but I can legally spare myself the humiliation of the polls. There are not that many legal transgressions left us in the enslaving Age of Information. On top of which, had I broken my golden rule for the referendum on the European Constitution in Paris, I'd be fuming even more today. Because the anarchist's assumption that, whatever the election, the dumbest almost invariably wins, was once again proven right.

July 6-8: West Coast Anti-Capitalist Convergence and March (July 8) against the G8

  • Posted on: 22 June 2005
  • By: worker

All Empires Must Fall!
West Coast Anti-Capitalist Mobilization Against the G8
July 6-8, San Francisco

Call for a West Coast anti-war and anti-capitalist mass convergence, July 6-8 of 2005 in San Francisco, in solidarity with the mobilization against the Group of Eight (G8) summit in Scotland. July 8 is the day of the March--Take the Streets & resist the Capitalist War Machine!

P.A. police gearing up for anarchists' protest

  • Posted on: 22 June 2005
  • By: worker

P.A. police gearing up for anarchists' protest

By Dan Stober and Anna Tong

Mercury News

The anarchists are coming! And Palo Alto police, who haven't seen a major protest since the Vietnam War, are calling in horses and helicopters to deal with what the police chief says could be a violent protest by 800 anarchists marching on University Avenue Saturday night.

Parecon and the nature of reformism

  • Posted on: 22 June 2005
  • By: worker

by Wayne Price

<em>A review of Robin Hahnel (2005). Economic Justice and Democracy; From Competition to Cooperation. NY/ London: Routledge</em>

The second most important problem for anticapitalist radicals is how to get from here to there; that is, how to get from a capitalist society to a good society. The first problem is where do we want to go--what we mean by a good, noncapitalist, society. Working together with Michael Albert, Robin Hahnel has spent years on this first problem, developing a model of what a good society might be like, or at least how its economy might work. In a series of books and essays (e.g., Albert 2000, 2005; Albert & Hahnel 1983, 1991), they have thought out how an economy might function which is managed by its people rather than by either private capitalists or bureaucrats--an economy managed through bottom-up democratic cooperation, rather than by either the market or centralized planning. They call this "participatory economics," or "parecon" for short. Their model involves coordination by councils of workers and consumers to produce an economic plan. I will not go into it now; it is further discussed in Hahnel’s current book. In my opinion, their model has enriched the discussion of what a socialist anarchist society might look like. .

A Retreat and a Consolidation

  • Posted on: 22 June 2005
  • By: worker

by Andrew - WSM

What has been happening in Chiapas in recent years?

The Zapatistas were one of the major influences on the development of the libertarian wing of globalization movement. What happens to them is significant not just for Mexico but also for the direction that movement takes. In recent years the direction of the Zapatistas has shifted from trying to spark off similar movements elsewhere to consolidating what they have in Chiapas. If not a physical defeat for the Zapatistas this certainly represents a significant scaling down of their hopes. I've already written at length about the positive aspects of the way the Zapatistas organize and I don't intend to repeat the detail of that argument here. To summarise - the non-military side of the organization is organized in a libertarian fashion through elected mandated and recallable delegates who are rotated at regular intervals. Regionally these delegates form 32 Autonomous Councils. The military side (EZLN) is hierichcal but the EZLN command is however answerable to the system of delegate councils. It doesn't make decisions on behalf of the people like most clandestine armies.

Pages