Crimethinc.

Rojava: Democracy and Commune

  • Posted on: 20 May 2016
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc. blog

In the latest installment in our series exploring the anarchist critique of democracy, guest author Paul Z. Simons offers us a meditation on revolutionary forms of organization. Drawing on his experiences in Rojava in 2015, he contrasts conventional democratic practices with what he has seen of democratic confederalism and evaluates the federation of communes as a model for North American anarchists. At a time when the ruling order has been discredited but there are very few proposals for how else to shape our lives, Simons suggests some much-needed points of departure.

Born in Flames, Died in Plenums

  • Posted on: 14 May 2016
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc. blog

In February 2014, two decades after the war that left Bosnia devastated and divided into three ethnic regions, the country erupted in flames again. This time, it was not ethnic strife, but the rage of people uniting against politicians. For years, these politicians had stirred up ethnic divisions to distract them while systematically looting the country. The result was intense poverty: unemployment was at 44 percent in 2014, and up to 60 percent among the young.

"Gotovo je!" Reflections on Direct Democracy in Slovenia

  • Posted on: 14 May 2016
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc. blog

Cold winter night. The smells of smoke and pepper spray are mixing in the air. From behind our backs, we hear the roaring of thousands and thousands of throats: “They [the politicians] are all finished! We will carry them all out!” In front of us, a burning fence, lines of riot police, and—in the foggy distance—the ultimate symbol of democracy, a parliamentary building. On our faces the cold breeze, beside us the shoulders of our comrades, and in our veins—electricity. Several months into the uprising, streets are still ours. What started as a protest against a few “bad seeds” of democracy has opened up a massive opportunity to think beyond the existent. For a brief moment, we have gained control over our lives, we allow ourselves to dream the impossible, we experiment with creating spaces of togetherness beyond hierarchies. In every second in which we discover our weakness, we also dare to regain our strength.

Between the Tours: Reflections on ‘To Change Everything’ and ‘The Spaces Between’

  • Posted on: 6 May 2016
  • By: thecollective

From It's Going Down

In the past year, the CrimethInc. Collective launched the ‘To Change Everything’ tour following the release of a text by the same name which was translated into multiple languages and published and distributed from Brazil to Korea. Hitting the road with a group of international anarchists who discussed a variety of struggles happening in their home countries, the tour hit large cities and smaller regions. The tour was in many ways a testament to the staying power and popularity of CrimethInc., as events were organized in many smaller areas without established radical groups and spaces. The tour also showed that even in places where you might not expect it, there is a growing interest in revolutionary anarchist ideas. However, the tour also made clear that in many places, there is little for those that are interested in these ideas to plug into. In a report following the tour, CrimethInc. wrote:

#48: From Democracy to Freedom Audio Zine

  • Posted on: 26 April 2016
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc. Ex-Workers' Collective

Welcome back to the Ex-worker! We’re eschewing our typical format once again to bring you our second audio zine, a production of Crimethinc.’s new text From Democracy to Freedom. This release coincides with the announcement of an online platform for participating in decentralized reading groups and online discussions on this text as well as the others in the series exploring questions around democracy, and how we relate to it as anarchists. {April 26, 2016}

Anarchy and Democracy Reading Groups!

  • Posted on: 20 April 2016
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

This month, we are publishing a series exploring an anarchist analysis of democracy, including case studies from anarchist participants in directly democratic movements around the world. As an offline counterpart to the series, we invite you to organize discussion groups about the relation between democracy and anarchy. We’re not finished thinking through this topic, and we want your help engaging with these questions. Our hope is that together we can produce new ideas and tactics that can be put to use in the next wave of unrest.

Destination Anarchy! Every Step Is an Obstacle

  • Posted on: 7 April 2016
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

I find myself in the courtyard of the School of Fine Arts in Athens, Greece. It’s May 25, 2011, a hot summer day. A five-day anarchist and anti-authoritarian festival starts in six hours and I am scrambling to prepare all the small details I have in mind. I’m working alone.

From 15M to Podemos

  • Posted on: 7 April 2016
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

I was shoulder to shoulder with a friend, pushing through the swarming crowds, the tens of thousands that had coalesced out of the democratic desolation to fill Plaça Catalunya, Barcelona’s central plaza. We were on our way back from a copy shop whose employees, also taken up in the fervor, let us print another five hundred copies of the latest open letter with a huge discount, easily paid for with all the change people were leaving in the donations jar at the info table we anarchists had set up.

From Democracy to Freedom

  • Posted on: 29 March 2016
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

This is part of a series expressing an anarchist critique of democracy.

Democracy is the most universal political ideal of our day. George Bush invoked it to justify invading Iraq; Obama congratulated the rebels of Tahrir Square for bringing it to Egypt; Occupy Wall Street claimed to have distilled its pure form. From the Democratic People’s Republic of North Korea to the autonomous region of Rojava, practically every government and popular movement calls itself democratic.

Pages