History

Damn Cocktails!

  • Posted on: 20 September 2016
  • By: thecollective

From ediciones chafa

The story of Mr. Molotov. And a bit of naphthalene against the myths.

Following the protests against the [French] Labor Law, on Sept. 15th 2016, the media noted two striking images: that of a protest gone one-eyed (likely caused by a grenade launched by the forces of order); and that of a gendarme mobile [French national police agent] “in flames.”

The Brilliant podcast: Episode 31 - Isaac Cronin I

  • Posted on: 3 September 2016
  • By: aragorn

From The Brilliant

This is the first in what is intended to be a year long series of interviews with an elder in the kind of politics that inform this podcast. Isaac Cronin is a writer, editor, and videographer (of sorts) who has published several books under the LBC imprint Cruel Hospice and who we have been friends with for several years.

A Non-Pacifist's Critique Of The Gun Debate

  • Posted on: 6 July 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Radicals around me from the far-Left, mainly anarchists, Marxists, and non-affiliated anti-fascists, since Obama was elected, have been up in arms about the looming potential of maybe losing their arms. After another example of mass death via the easy accessibility of mass-murdering weapons, Democratic politicians in the US are trying again to reform the legalize-faire laws on guns. People I know are saying guns=revolution, that they, as a small minority in arms, will have the ability to stop the neoliberal-State and/or fascist-State.

The Economics of Anarchy

  • Posted on: 22 June 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

After a bit of a break, I’m continuing with the installments from the “Anarchist Current,” the Afterword to Volume Three of my anthology of anarchist writings from ancient China to the present day, Anarchism: A Documentary History of Libertarian Ideas. This section discusses different anarchist approaches to economic organization.

But What The Fuck Is May Day?

  • Posted on: 17 May 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

https://thetransmetropolitanreview.wordpress.com/2016/05/17/but-what-the...

In the 1880s, U.S. anarchists, socialists, and unions sidestepped the stale reform-versus-revolution debate by fighting for the eight-hour workday. Their agitation and actions targeted both employers and the state. They declared on May 1st, 1886, the eight-hour day would be enacted, or they would shut down the country with a general strike. And on the day of, half a million people went out on strike.

Revolutionary Shop Stewards and Workers Councils in the German Revolution

  • Posted on: 7 May 2016
  • By: thecollective

If Ralf Hoffrogge were writing within an American context rather than a German one, he would be situated between two important developments in the United States. A new cohort of social movement historians is addressing the gaps in anarchist, anti-authoritarian, and left-communist historiography. Neighboring this is a resurgence of interest in workers' councils historically and in the contemporary period.

Anarchism's Mid-Century Turn

  • Posted on: 3 May 2016
  • By: thecollective

Review & Response: Unruly Equality: U.S. Anarchism in the Twentieth Century, By Andrew Cornell, University of California Press, 2016, 300 pages.

Part One

Transitions

No matter how one feels about it, the current state of anarchism has represented something of a mystery: What was once a mass movement based mainly in working class immigrant communities is now an archipelago of subcultural scenes inhabited largely by disaffected young people from the white middle class.

Tags: 

Topic of the Week: Racism

  • Posted on: 14 March 2016
  • By: thecollective

We have focused a lot of energy, as anarchists and as human beings, in the past year and a half on the history of oppression that we call racism in this country. Those conversations have looked like reflections on the impact that slavery, segregation, and jim crow laws have had on today. What we haven't done, and should, is plan for the future. What would we like to see the future of race relations look like?

Pages