History

March 18, 1871: The Birth of the Paris Commune

  • Posted on: 18 March 2017
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

The year is 1871. Revolution has just established a democratic government in France, following the defeat of emperor Napoleon in the war with Germany. But the new Republic satisfies no one. The provisional government is comprised of politicians who served under the Emperor; they have done nothing to satisfy the revolutionaries’ demands for social change, and they don’t intend to. Right-wing reactionaries are conspiring to reinstate the Emperor or, failing that, some other monarch. Only rebel Paris stands between France and counterrevolution.

IWD 2017: Celebrating a new revolution

  • Posted on: 9 March 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From Anarkismo

This time around, let’s fight for workers’ control from the start. Let’s create structures with checks and balances that ensure workers keep control. Let us not hand over power to a state that can institute tyranny all over again. We want anarchist communist organisation. Workers' delegation. Equable procedures. Bottom up organisation. It is 100 years since women workers began the 1917 revolution. Let’s do it again! The time for global revolution is here!

Laurance Labadie, Gloomy Keeper of the Flame

  • Posted on: 3 March 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Laurance Labadie was born in Detroit, in the summer of 1898, the son of the famously affable anarchist Joseph A. Labadie. Jo, as he was called, neither pressed anarchism on his children nor seems to have done very much pressing or parenting at all, preferring to allow the Labadie brood space to learn and grow on their own terms. That they, to his disappointment, never found much happiness or success suggests, perhaps, that the anarchist’s aversion to hierarchical relationships is ill-suited to the business of raising children into content and independent adults. Though certainly independent of thought and action, Joseph’s son Laurance was anything but content. Even to those who loved him and considered him family, the younger Labadie did not inherit his father’s easy, obliging way. In her book All-American Anarchist: Joseph A. Labadie and the Labor Movement, Laurance’s niece, Carlotta Anderson, writes that he “bitterly disappointed both parents,” never marrying or achieving career or financial success.

Ricardo Mella, “The Bankruptcy of Beliefs” and “The Rising Anarchism” (1902-03)

  • Posted on: 1 February 2017
  • By: thecollective

The two articles below present a very challenging vision of the development of a revolutionary anarchism. They continue Mella’s arguments for an anarchism “without adjectives,” picking up elements already present in his work in the 1880s, but also connect that notion to the idea of an “anarchist synthesis,” long before Voline presented his account of anarchist development and the need for synthesis that emerges from the very nature of anarchism itself. The translation, from Spanish, is perhaps a little rough around the edges, but I think the ideas are clear enough.]

Thoughts on Berkman, interview with Barry and Jessica

  • Posted on: 28 January 2017
  • By: thecollective

An annotated edition of Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist has just been published by AK Press. Jessica Moran and Barry Pateman who edited it are both part of the Kate Sharpley Library team, so KSL took the chance to ask them a few questions. This interview and many other articles appear in Bulletin of the Kate Sharpley Library No. 89:

KSL: Prison Memoirs is a classic, and much reprinted. You’ve annotated the text to help readers understand ‘the radical world that Berkman inhabited’. What else did you hope this edition would do?

Whoever They Vote For, We Are Ungovernable

  • Posted on: 16 January 2017
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

A History of Anarchist Counter-Inaugural Protest

Thousands of protestors will stream into the streets of Washington, DC on January 20 to oppose the incoming presidency of Donald Trump. As they march, chant, unfurl their banners, and attempt to disrupt the inauguration, they step into a decades-long history of protests against the presidential spectacle.

Forgotten anarchist Simón Radowitzky’s life retold in graphic novel

  • Posted on: 28 December 2016
  • By: thecollective

From The Guardian

Sixty years after his death, the peripatetic and violent life of one of the most remarkable minor characters in 20th-century history is being retold on the black, white and red pages of a graphic novel.

The anarchist Simón Radowitzky may be half-forgotten today, but his struggles in tsarist Russia, banishment to the “Argentinian Siberia” and participation in the Spanish civil war made him a legendary figure in his own time.

Anarchic Practices In the Territory Dominatred by the Chilean State

  • Posted on: 22 October 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From Its Going Down

To get a picture of the anarchist movement in Chile and, further, to understand the phenomenon of its impetus, resurgence and persistence over time as an irreducible practice, threatening capitalist normality and unchecked of any negotiations with bourgeois legalism, one must understand the ongoing tension between the mechanisms of repression applied by the STATE and the liberating and uncompromising response by the ANTI-AUTHORITARIAN network throughout its history.

Pages