Nuit Debout

France: the latest...

  • Posted on: 5 June 2016
  • By: SamFantoSamotnaf

From afar (and even within France amongst the young – those who’ve never before directly experienced a nationwide movement) what’s going on seems like the prelude to a social revolution. This tends to make those yearning for a revolution to exaggerate to such an extent what’s going on that some even believe that now is the time to talk of the form and content of workers’ councils; which would be a bit like talking about what your son or daughter is going to call the name of their baby when they’re still a virgin and have only just had their first snog.

France: Short response to the enraged proletarians

  • Posted on: 29 May 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Far from us to claim we represent the «movement», but since you use Mpalothia as «media» broadcast we felt questioned.

You look at «our struggle», so we have taken note.

To be clear we specify that «our struggle» existed before the «movement» and will not end with it, even if the reform of the labor code would be repealed.

Indeed, we do not care about law and we do not care about work. We just wish both to disappear.

Our goal is not to reform or improve capitalism but to destroy it, to wipe out it by fire and by all means everyone deems useful.

Dispatches from France One: the Forces Behind Events, Autonomism and Anarchism, and What Time Is It?

  • Posted on: 27 May 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

My decision to travel to Europe was taken lackadaisically. There had been some indications that nation-states on the Continent were being stressed from a number of different directions. First, the movement of upwards of two million refugees from the Middle East, specifically Syria, through the social-democratic European heartland is challenging the legitimacy of both the economic and security structures of numerous states.

France’s ‘Nuit Debout’ movement & anarchist critiques of direct democracy (+related news)

  • Posted on: 24 April 2016
  • By: thecollective

From Rable.org.uk and other sources at end

The wave of rebellion unleashed in France in response to the El-Khomri labour law has been impressive. The fighting spirit and political acuity shown by many of those blockading their colleges, blocking the railway lines, looting supermarkets and distributing the goods, attacking police stations, and disseminating tracts against work itself is beautiful. But since 31st March, a new, friendlier-looking trend has emerged alongside the riots. On that night, people responded to a call for a ‘Nuit Debout’ (night on your feet) to occupy something after the day’s demos. In Paris it led to a large and continuous occupation of Place de la Republique. People had discussions, partied, and even prevented the eviction of Stalingrad migrant camp (note: the camp at Stalingrad is populated by several hundred refugees, many of whom have fled police harassment and eviction in Calais, and it & other migrant squats in the city have has been evicted at least 18 times(!) since last June). The occupations grew in size and spread rapidly over France and into Belgium and Spain.

March 39 and counting… Nuit Debout and the new French uprising

  • Posted on: 8 April 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

The spirit of resistance has captured the imagination of a new generation in France, as youth-led opposition to neoliberal labour “reforms” has spiralled into full-on rejection of the whole capitalist system on the street and squares.

The situation took on a new dimension after the general strike and day of action on Thursday March 31. There was a call for people not to go home afterwards but to stay on the streets, beginning a wave of overnight “Nuit Debout” occupations that has spread from Paris across France and into the Iberian peninsular, Belgium and Germany.