France

Besançon, France: Back from the Holidays, Back in the Fight

  • Posted on: 21 September 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

While the end of last year was marked by social problems that caused a bit of trouble for the powerful, the summer of 2016 brought fiery revolts against this world of misery and oppression. First and foremost, these took aim at those who most obviously carry of the violence of the powerful, namely the cops and the gendarmes [military-style police].

While some go off on vacation, others stay trapped in the prison world of the ghettos. On Tuesday July 19 in Beaumont-sur-Oise in Val-d’Oise, Adama Traore was killed by gendarmes while being arrested. To conceal his death by suffocation at the hands of the pigs, the state immediately began talking about “heart troubles … respiratory troubles … pulmonary infections” and so on. Every time some dies in custody, power puts on the same grim spectacle, with the complicity of the media. This time, Beaumont and Persan [two towns in Val-d’Oise] responded with several nights of revolt, during which many municipal and state buildings (police stations, libraries, garages for city vehicles) as well as capitalist infrastructure (gas stations, supermarkets…) went up in smoke or had their windows smashed.

Damn Cocktails!

  • Posted on: 20 September 2016
  • By: thecollective

From ediciones chafa

The story of Mr. Molotov. And a bit of naphthalene against the myths.

Following the protests against the [French] Labor Law, on Sept. 15th 2016, the media noted two striking images: that of a protest gone one-eyed (likely caused by a grenade launched by the forces of order); and that of a gendarme mobile [French national police agent] “in flames.”

Paris: We’re still here : Reportback on the events of Thursday September 15 against the Labour Law

  • Posted on: 17 September 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Reportback on a series of demonstrations this past thursday, September 16. From 6:30 in the morning, high school students were already throwing down. Some short reports are available here: http://www.streetpress.com/sujet/1473952695-lycee-loi-travail-black-bloc

At 11am, there was supposed to be a secret meetup with some high school groups at Nation square, but the cops found out about it: tons and tons of pigs all over the square. While some demonstrators got kettled, about 200 of us (mostly higschool students or youth) regrouped in front of Helene Boucher school on Cours de Vincennes and decided to take the metro to Lyon Station.

Tags: 

Paris: There will be no presidential election

  • Posted on: 17 September 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

A call to break with the electoral circus

(Translated from an anonymous leaflet distributed in the September 15th 2016 demo in Paris. All brackets are translators notes)

There has been much water under the bridge since the Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste, PS — party of French president Hollande) backed down from holding their summer congress in Nantes after a simple call to crash it. This came at the end of four months during which the movement against the “Work!” law (reform to the labour code) managed to dictate the terms and timeline of the debate. Four months during which the many attempts at concealing the real political questions of our present moment by launching the presidential campaign, with it’s clever catch phrases and insignificant revelations, were utterly rejected. It took the summer, the dead-time of the vacation season, and a few terrorist attacks to allow the elites to climb back into the saddle.

Tags: 

France: the latest...

  • Posted on: 5 June 2016
  • By: SamFantoSamotnaf

From afar (and even within France amongst the young – those who’ve never before directly experienced a nationwide movement) what’s going on seems like the prelude to a social revolution. This tends to make those yearning for a revolution to exaggerate to such an extent what’s going on that some even believe that now is the time to talk of the form and content of workers’ councils; which would be a bit like talking about what your son or daughter is going to call the name of their baby when they’re still a virgin and have only just had their first snog.

Dispatches from France Two: Manifestación 5/27/16, Who’s on First, Losing a Friend in a Riot, and Black Bloc Logistics

  • Posted on: 30 May 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

By El Errante

(Paris, Ile de France, 28/05/16) The scene is becoming clearer and it doesn’t look good. On one side of the street a line of CRS (Compagnies Républicaines de Sécurité) stands in a wall, unmoving, silent, ready. And opposite them by about 100 meters is another solid row of CRS, hard rubber matraques held ready. I look down at Loni, whose view is obscured by the mob, and tell her to get ready, they may use gas. She and I both fish around in our backpacks for the red and black handkerchiefs that the Federation Anarchiste (FA) folks had given us. Movement is impossible in the crush, and I find myself less worried about being pummeled about the head and shoulders by CRS goons than the likelihood of being smothered or trampled should the crowd move or run suddenly. Two or three dull explosive thuds resound in the sunshine and a cloud of teargas, wafted by a slight breeze, moves ghostlike over the crowd. The sound of choking erupts immediately as the protestors begin to move away from grayish blue gas…

France: Short response to the enraged proletarians

  • Posted on: 29 May 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Far from us to claim we represent the «movement», but since you use Mpalothia as «media» broadcast we felt questioned.

You look at «our struggle», so we have taken note.

To be clear we specify that «our struggle» existed before the «movement» and will not end with it, even if the reform of the labor code would be repealed.

Indeed, we do not care about law and we do not care about work. We just wish both to disappear.

Our goal is not to reform or improve capitalism but to destroy it, to wipe out it by fire and by all means everyone deems useful.

French oil and nuclear workers join wave of strikes, riots, and blockades.

  • Posted on: 27 May 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Via: https://laserveuse.tumblr.com/

The oil strikes and blockades, which are now being reported more in the international press, have been ongoing since Thursday 19th, and with increasing strength. On Thursday we heard it was not possible to get cash or oil in Rennes, since the ATMs were smashed during the manifestation, and the refineries were on strike. This is an explicit case in which the actions of casseurs support the actions of a strike. Every day there has been news of another refinery blocked, a new one evicted. They are often reoccupied. Road blockades are too many to count. The headlines suggest that the union, the CGT, has the power to block the country, and Manuel Valls has reproached them for the same crime. On Tuesday Minister Bruno Le Roux (the leader of the Parti Socialiste inside parliament) seemed to move on the law, saying it could be modified, but head of FO Jean Claude Mailly, wrote back with the minimal demand of retraction. On thursday morning, a senior CGT member reported having received personal and intimidating text messages from a government minister.

Account of May 1, 2016 in Paris: Anarchists defile libertarian procession

  • Posted on: 19 May 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

May 1, 2016. Like every Sunday there is the market at la Place des Fêtes. Like every May 1 it is the super-market of the libertarian organizations. Always the same routine, the same resigned faces, the same sad slogans, the same mythomaniac banners (“Kill Capitalism,” “Strikes, looting, sabotage”). This year some individuals decide to break this routine, and anarchism invites itself to the libertarian procession.

France’s ‘Nuit Debout’ movement & anarchist critiques of direct democracy (+related news)

  • Posted on: 24 April 2016
  • By: thecollective

From Rable.org.uk and other sources at end

The wave of rebellion unleashed in France in response to the El-Khomri labour law has been impressive. The fighting spirit and political acuity shown by many of those blockading their colleges, blocking the railway lines, looting supermarkets and distributing the goods, attacking police stations, and disseminating tracts against work itself is beautiful. But since 31st March, a new, friendlier-looking trend has emerged alongside the riots. On that night, people responded to a call for a ‘Nuit Debout’ (night on your feet) to occupy something after the day’s demos. In Paris it led to a large and continuous occupation of Place de la Republique. People had discussions, partied, and even prevented the eviction of Stalingrad migrant camp (note: the camp at Stalingrad is populated by several hundred refugees, many of whom have fled police harassment and eviction in Calais, and it & other migrant squats in the city have has been evicted at least 18 times(!) since last June). The occupations grew in size and spread rapidly over France and into Belgium and Spain.

Pages