Anarchy Bang: Introducing Episode Sixteen

  • Posted on: 19 April 2019
  • By: anarchybang

Anarchist Responses To The Mainstream Nightmare

From Anarchy Bang

A couple individuals has asked how "post left" anarchists respond, in practical terms, to the rise of the right, to the impact of daily immiseration, and the general rise of the ick. I can't speak for a position I do not hold (and that generally should be thought of as a critique and not a position) but if there is something different about second wave anarchy (broadly defined as an anarchist position informed by May 68 rather than Spain of 36) let's discuss it and think about it. Insurrection rather than revolution? About individuals rather than categories? Perhaps about categories rather than classes? About reach rather than grasp? Let's talk about new(er) ideas in anarchy and how they have and have not given us more practical ideas about anarchist practice. This Sunday at noon (PST) call in for live discussion. The rest of the week for downloads and whatnot.

Join in the conversation!

Sunday at noon (PST or -7 UTC) at https://anarchybang.com/ Email questions ahead if you like The real time IRC is a chaotic mess (and pleasure). There are better ways to connect to IRC but it involves some reading The call in number is (646) 787-8464

Comments

How the fuck is this questionable? Attack shit!

Get in the speedboats now!! Motherfuckers!! We must attack! There shall be no diversity of tactics - crimethinc is wrong on this!

Any attempts at turning this into anything but focoist asymmetrical WARFARE must be attacked! Put your body online.

Che was an anarchist.

Signed,
The Niger Delta Mother Fuckers Street Team

Neither El Che nor maoist focoism are anarchist, in fact.

This is not ME!

Putting my dick pics on Facebook straight away!!! This looks like a bold new tactic for wins.

Also the Che was gay.

what anarchist is informed by May 68 for that matter Spain 36

enough critique, and theory, and waiting, just attack everything

Yes comrade we are with you! Ready to put our bodies on the line unlike these domesticated pussy informed readers! Strike fast strike hard show no mercy!
HURRICANE GOON SQUAD OPERATIVE #9

WTF what happened to OST?

∆T∆R∆X!$ PR∆X!$
Best thing we've read all day.
-
Hyperplastic-Supernormal
http://readthis.wtf/writing/hyperplastic-supernormal/

i read this. what do you want from me?

alternative titles:

“postmordernist’s first day at marketing”

“paraphiac’s first day at industrial design”

tl;dr: consumerism is really exciting and novel for hacks that like longwinded essays

this essay reads like an article from “the guardian” but with less detailed and interesting information, and all the postmodern and academic terms you can cram in

i can say more and worse things about it

*paraphiliac’s

while am at it, why does your acc praxis consists of posting articles that only i will read and will subsequently become annoyed by?

This guy's affect sure was distended by the ingress of increasingly sophisticated technologies. The crux of the matter is that he's not controlling these technologies, not even their facetious increase in sophistication.

What a mind job, this GO3... Well, have fun in your condo.

Robin MacKay...

You just got me a new person to assassinate this year. Thank you so much!

The Stone Sky: Modernism in the works of Stone
Jean-Francois H. de Selby

Department of Future Studies, University of Massachusetts

1. Consensuses of stasis

The main theme of Long’s[1] analysis of Marxist class is
the failure, and thus the meaninglessness, of dialectic sexual identity. The
subject is interpolated into a modernism that includes consciousness as a
reality. In a sense, Lacan promotes the use of neodeconstructive dematerialism
to read language.

Any number of conceptualisms concerning the difference between society and
class may be discovered. Therefore, Marxist class suggests that society has
intrinsic meaning.

An abundance of narratives concerning the cultural paradigm of reality
exist. Thus, Sontag suggests the use of modernism to attack sexism.

D’Erlette[2] states that we have to choose between
Marxist class and material materialism. But the primary theme of the works of
Joyce is not discourse, but neodiscourse.
2. Joyce and Foucaultist power relations

“Class is fundamentally meaningless,” says Baudrillard; however, according
to Bailey[3] , it is not so much class that is fundamentally
meaningless, but rather the dialectic, and some would say the absurdity, of
class. The subject is contextualised into a modernism that includes narrativity
as a whole. It could be said that the characteristic theme of de Selby’s[4] model of dialectic appropriation is the genre of
postcapitalist language.

“Class is part of the paradigm of art,” says Lacan. In Finnegan’s
Wake, Joyce examines dialectic desituationism; in Ulysses, although,
he affirms Marxist class. But many theories concerning not desublimation, as
Baudrillard would have it, but predesublimation may be revealed.

If one examines neotextual socialism, one is faced with a choice: either
accept Marxist class or conclude that reality is used to reinforce class
divisions. The main theme of the works of Joyce is the role of the observer as
artist. It could be said that Lyotard uses the term ‘the capitalist paradigm of
narrative’ to denote not, in fact, discourse, but postdiscourse.

The characteristic theme of Abian’s[5] critique of
modernism is the common ground between truth and class. In a sense, the subject
is interpolated into a dialectic appropriation that includes consciousness as a
paradox.

If neotextual capitalism holds, the works of Joyce are postmodern. However,
an abundance of situationisms concerning modernism exist.

Marx’s analysis of Marxist class suggests that the collective is a legal
fiction. Thus, many theories concerning the role of the observer as participant
may be discovered.

Sontag uses the term ‘modernism’ to denote the futility, and hence the fatal
flaw, of dialectic society. In a sense, the subject is contextualised into a
Marxist class that includes truth as a whole.
3. Foucaultist power relations and precultural Marxism

The main theme of the works of Joyce is not sublimation per se, but
neosublimation. Prinn[6] implies that we have to choose
between modernism and postcultural narrative. Therefore, Marx uses the term
‘dialectic neopatriarchial theory’ to denote the bridge between language and
class.

“Sexual identity is part of the fatal flaw of consciousness,” says Foucault;
however, according to Pickett[7] , it is not so much sexual
identity that is part of the fatal flaw of consciousness, but rather the
defining characteristic, and subsequent rubicon, of sexual identity. A number
of theories concerning modernism exist. In a sense, the premise of
preconceptualist dialectic theory states that reality, surprisingly, has
objective value, but only if truth is interchangeable with sexuality; if that
is not the case, the task of the writer is significant form.

In Finnegan’s Wake, Joyce denies dialectic appropriation; in
Dubliners, however, he affirms modernism. Therefore, an abundance of
narratives concerning the futility, and thus the meaninglessness, of
postsemiotic class may be found.

Lyotard uses the term ‘the materialist paradigm of context’ to denote the
role of the artist as observer. Thus, a number of constructions concerning
dialectic appropriation exist.

The characteristic theme of Prinn’s[8] critique of
precultural objectivism is the difference between consciousness and society. It
could be said that any number of dematerialisms concerning not narrative, but
subnarrative may be revealed.
4. Consensuses of dialectic

In the works of Joyce, a predominant concept is the distinction between
opening and closing. Derrida uses the term ‘precultural Marxism’ to denote a
self-sufficient totality. Therefore, the main theme of the works of Joyce is
the role of the writer as poet.

If one examines dialectic appropriation, one is faced with a choice: either
reject precultural Marxism or conclude that narrativity may be used to
marginalize the proletariat. Lyotard uses the term ‘dialectic appropriation’ to
denote the defining characteristic, and eventually the rubicon, of
constructivist sexual identity. In a sense, the example of precultural Marxism
intrinsic to Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake is also evident in
Dubliners.

The subject is interpolated into a neodialectic paradigm of reality that
includes culture as a paradox. But many discourses concerning modernism exist.

Baudrillard promotes the use of textual precapitalist theory to analyse and
read society. In a sense, the characteristic theme of la Fournier’s[9] analysis of dialectic appropriation is not narrative, as
Foucault would have it, but postnarrative.

If modernism holds, we have to choose between prepatriarchial Marxism and
Marxist capitalism. Thus, Sontag suggests the use of precultural Marxism to
challenge sexism.

1. Long, Q. (1996) Dialectic
appropriation and modernism. Loompanics

2. d’Erlette, G. C. ed. (1975) Subdialectic Theories:
Dialectic appropriation in the works of Joyce. University of Illinois
Press

3. Bailey, R. (1981) Modernism and dialectic
appropriation. Cambridge University Press

4. de Selby, Z. I. ed. (1977) The Meaninglessness of
Sexual identity: Dialectic appropriation and modernism. Panic Button
Books

5. Abian, Q. F. O. (1984) Modernism in the works of
McLaren. Schlangekraft

6. Prinn, K. ed. (1990) The Expression of Paradigm:
Modernism and dialectic appropriation. And/Or Press

7. Pickett, I. G. I. (1978) Marxism, capitalist feminism
and modernism. Panic Button Books

8. Prinn, H. N. ed. (1999) The Genre of Reality: Dialectic
appropriation and modernism. Harvard University Press

9. la Fournier, E. (1971) Modernism and dialectic
appropriation. Schlangekraft

The essay you have just seen is completely meaningless and was randomly generated by the Postmodernism Generator. To generate another essay, follow this link.
If you liked this particular essay and would like to return to it, follow this link for a bookmarkable page.

The Postmodernism Generator was written by Andrew C. Bulhak using the Dada Engine, a system for generating random text from recursive grammars, and modified very slightly by Josh Larios (this version, anyway. There are others out there).

This installation of the Generator has delivered 20,133,094 essays since 25/Feb/2000 18:43:09 PST, when it became operational.

More detailed technical information may be found in Monash University Department of Computer Science Technical Report 96/264: “On the Simulation of Postmodernism and Mental Debility Using Recursive Transition Networks“.

More generated texts are linked to from the sidebar to the right.

If you enjoy this, you might also enjoy reading about the Social Text Affair, where NYU Physics Professor Alan Sokal’s brilliant(ly meaningless) hoax article was accepted by a cultural criticism publication.

needs more neologisms, compound words, and techno-euphoria.
it must wrap around to express an exaltation and excitement over the status-quo and the inevitable acceleration of current trends.

Neodeconstructivist dialectic theory and capitalist preconstructive
theory
Martin V. D. Dahmus

Department of Politics, University of Massachusetts

1. Capitalist preconstructive theory and posttextual narrative

“Narrativity is meaningless,” says Derrida; however, according to Parry[1] , it is not so much narrativity that is meaningless, but
rather the rubicon, and subsequent stasis, of narrativity. In a sense, Lacan
suggests the use of posttextual narrative to analyse and modify sexual
identity.

In the works of Gibson, a predominant concept is the concept of presemiotic
language. A number of materialisms concerning not, in fact, theory, but
neotheory may be revealed. But if capitalist preconstructive theory holds, the
works of Gibson are an example of self-justifying socialism.

“Society is part of the genre of narrativity,” says Baudrillard; however,
according to Dietrich[2] , it is not so much society that is
part of the genre of narrativity, but rather the rubicon, and some would say
the failure, of society. Sartre uses the term ‘preconceptualist objectivism’ to
denote the role of the reader as artist. It could be said that several
deconstructions concerning neodeconstructivist dialectic theory exist.

Lyotard’s analysis of posttextual narrative implies that expression must
come from the masses, but only if the premise of neodeconstructivist dialectic
theory is valid; if that is not the case, culture is intrinsically elitist. In
a sense, Sartre promotes the use of capitalist preconstructive theory to attack
hierarchy.

Posttextual narrative holds that narrativity, ironically, has objective
value. However, Debord uses the term ‘capitalist preconstructive theory’ to
denote the economy, and subsequent genre, of dialectic class.

An abundance of discourses concerning the role of the poet as observer may
be discovered. But the characteristic theme of Reicher’s[3]
model of neodeconstructivist dialectic theory is the absurdity of textual
society.

The premise of posttextual narrative implies that the significance of the
artist is deconstruction. Thus, Hubbard[4] states that we
have to choose between Lyotardist narrative and the textual paradigm of
context.
2. Gibson and neodeconstructivist dialectic theory

In the works of Gibson, a predominant concept is the distinction between
within and without. The primary theme of the works of Gibson is the role of the
reader as participant. It could be said that Baudrillard suggests the use of
posttextual narrative to read sexual identity.

If one examines Lacanist obscurity, one is faced with a choice: either
accept capitalist preconstructive theory or conclude that reality is a product
of communication, but only if sexuality is distinct from language; otherwise,
we can assume that the goal of the reader is significant form. Derrida uses the
term ‘neodeconstructivist dialectic theory’ to denote the difference between
consciousness and class. Therefore, several theories concerning subsemantic
capitalist theory exist.

Posttextual narrative implies that reality is used to reinforce capitalism.
But the example of Marxist capitalism intrinsic to Gibson’s Mona Lisa
Overdrive emerges again in Pattern Recognition.

The premise of neodeconstructivist dialectic theory states that sexual
identity has significance. Therefore, Sontag uses the term ‘prestructuralist
discourse’ to denote a mythopoetical whole.

Lacan promotes the use of posttextual narrative to deconstruct the status
quo. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a dialectic
paradigm of consensus that includes culture as a reality.

If neodeconstructivist dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between
subtextual dialectic theory and neocapitalist desublimation. In a sense, Debord
uses the term ‘neodeconstructivist dialectic theory’ to denote the bridge
between sexuality and sexual identity.
3. Realities of meaninglessness

In the works of Gibson, a predominant concept is the concept of dialectic
narrativity. The subject is contextualised into a posttextual narrative that
includes sexuality as a paradox. Thus, Cameron[5] suggests
that we have to choose between capitalist preconstructive theory and
predeconstructive capitalist theory.

If one examines neodeconstructivist dialectic theory, one is faced with a
choice: either reject Lacanist obscurity or conclude that the media is part of
the futility of narrativity, but only if Foucault’s analysis of
neodeconstructivist dialectic theory is invalid; if that is not the case,
Debord’s model of the subcultural paradigm of consensus is one of “material
theory”, and thus fundamentally meaningless. A number of deappropriations
concerning not narrative, as posttextual narrative suggests, but neonarrative
may be found. It could be said that the characteristic theme of Buxton’s[6] critique of poststructuralist textual theory is the common
ground between society and reality.

An abundance of desituationisms concerning neodeconstructivist dialectic
theory exist. In a sense, if capitalist preconstructive theory holds, we have
to choose between posttextual narrative and presemanticist nationalism.

The primary theme of the works of Joyce is a self-falsifying reality. But
Marx uses the term ‘neodeconstructivist dialectic theory’ to denote the
difference between sexual identity and class.

Sartre suggests the use of capitalist preconstructive theory to challenge
and analyse narrativity. Thus, the characteristic theme of Brophy’s[7] model of posttextual narrative is the role of the poet as
writer.

The premise of the cultural paradigm of consensus holds that reality may be
used to exploit the Other. However, Bataille promotes the use of
neodeconstructivist dialectic theory to attack class divisions.
4. Poststructural theory and capitalist construction

“Class is part of the meaninglessness of narrativity,” says Lyotard.
Scuglia[8] implies that we have to choose between
neodeconstructivist dialectic theory and Derridaist reading. But in Melrose
Place, Spelling analyses subsemiotic discourse; in Models, Inc.,
however, he denies capitalist construction.

In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the distinction between
closing and opening. Foucault uses the term ‘capitalist posttextual theory’ to
denote the common ground between consciousness and class. In a sense, the
primary theme of the works of Spelling is a mythopoetical whole.

If one examines capitalist construction, one is faced with a choice: either
accept neodeconstructivist dialectic theory or conclude that the task of the
artist is social comment, given that sexuality is interchangeable with culture.
Bataille uses the term ‘capitalist construction’ to denote the role of the
writer as participant. Therefore, neodeconstructivist dialectic theory suggests
that context comes from the collective unconscious.

If capitalist preconstructive theory holds, the works of Spelling are
postmodern. It could be said that several desituationisms concerning a
dialectic reality may be revealed.

The premise of subdeconstructive materialism holds that reality is capable
of intent, but only if neodeconstructivist dialectic theory is valid;
otherwise, we can assume that the Constitution is intrinsically impossible. In
a sense, any number of discourses concerning capitalist construction exist.

The premise of capitalist construction implies that language is used to
entrench hierarchy, given that consciousness is equal to language. But the
figure/ground distinction prevalent in Spelling’s The Heights is also
evident in Melrose Place, although in a more self-sufficient sense.

The main theme of Dietrich’s[9] essay on capitalist
construction is the bridge between society and sexual identity. Therefore,
Foucault uses the term ‘neodeconstructivist dialectic theory’ to denote a
mythopoetical paradox.

In Robin’s Hoods, Spelling examines neodeconstructive dialectic
theory; in Charmed he deconstructs neodeconstructivist dialectic theory.
In a sense, the primary theme of the works of Spelling is the failure, and some
would say the dialectic, of postsemioticist truth.

1. Parry, F. A. ed. (1978) The
Stone Door: The dialectic paradigm of reality, libertarianism and
neodeconstructivist dialectic theory. O’Reilly & Associates

2. Dietrich, J. B. Y. (1999) Capitalist preconstructive
theory and neodeconstructivist dialectic theory. Panic Button Books

3. Reicher, U. ed. (1971) Neocapitalist Narratives:
Neodeconstructivist dialectic theory in the works of Pynchon. University of
Oregon Press

4. Hubbard, D. Q. (1995) Neodeconstructivist dialectic
theory and capitalist preconstructive theory. Yale University Press

5. Cameron, V. Q. G. ed. (1987) The Rubicon of Discourse:
Neodeconstructivist dialectic theory in the works of Glass.
Schlangekraft

6. Buxton, C. (1973) Capitalist preconstructive theory in
the works of Joyce. Loompanics

7. Brophy, Y. F. R. ed. (1984) Realities of Failure:
Neodeconstructivist dialectic theory in the works of Madonna. Cambridge
University Press

8. Scuglia, H. (1972) Capitalist preconstructive theory in
the works of Spelling. O’Reilly & Associates

9. Dietrich, Z. N. B. ed. (1998) Postpatriarchialist
Desublimations: Libertarianism, neodeconstructivist dialectic theory and
cultural socialism. Panic Button Books

The article makes a lot more sense than this horseshit but at least you had some fun.

definitely, since your was a real article written by a real person with something to say. these were generated by a program, which makes them acc in that way, even if the content is gibberish. the person that posted them thought they styllistically resembled the one posted.

the article you posted says: “look how we can tickle the brain with stimuli!” but with much more words.

Add new comment