Essays

Taking on the G8 in Scotland, July 2005: A Retrospective

  • Posted on: 27 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

In 2005, when the rulers of the eight most powerful countries in the world gathered in Scotland, capitalism seemed invincible and eternal. Most protesters limited themselves to begging the G8 to be nicer to the nations on the receiving end of colonialism and imperialist wars. Yet a few thousand anarchists, recognizing how short-lived “the end of history” would be, set out on a seemingly suicidal mission to blockade the summit and demonstrate what sort of resistance it would take to create another world. Today, as the 2017 G20 Summit in Hamburg approaches, we publish this retrospective to keep the adventures and lessons of 2005 alive as part of the contemporary heritage of the international anarchist movement.

Being the subMedia

  • Posted on: 27 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Mask Magazine

Frank Lopez aka “The Stimulator” has been making explosive anarchist videos since the early 2000s. Together with his collective subMedia.TV, he recently launched the new documentary show Trouble.

“Greetings troublemakers, welcome to Trouble. My name is not important.”

Trouble is an apt name for subMedia’s new documentary show. If there’s one thing that defines the ethos of the North America-based video production collective, it’s trouble. Committed to fighting racism, capitalism, and the state, their fourth episode “No Justice… Just Us” was released last Sunday and covers ongoing organizing against state repression and prisons.

Embracing the Antinomies

  • Posted on: 27 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From C4SS by Shawn P. Wilbur

It should be clear that one of the key conflicts in these debates about anarchy and democracy is a struggle over the nature of anarchism. And it is probably safe to say that nearly all anarchists wrestle with the difficulties of defining that term. Part of the difficulty is that anarchism is simultaneously a kind of system and a matter of tradition. It is at once a political—or anti-political—ideology, a social-scientific approach, and a body of practices that have emerged within—and sometimes against—a particular set of social movements. It is no surprise, then, when our discussions of anarchist theory and practice oscillate between, on the one hand, attempts to show logical consistency between given practices and established principles and, on the other, appeals to the practices of certain pioneers.

Anarchists Failed Philando Castile and They Have Failed Black Americans

  • Posted on: 27 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Gods and Radicals by Dr. Bones

When I put two rituals in my book to hex the police some people said I had gone too far. I had to talk with a team of editors about possible re-writes, had to discuss plans about what we’d do when the FBI eventually got a hold of it. I worried then. Now, with the dash cam footage released in the recent murder of Philando Castile I wish I would have wrote 40 more. An armed gang who exists only to protect the wealthy and kill people of color is running rampant and Anarchists are woefully unable to do anything about it. This needs to change immediately.

Return to Post-Anarchism

  • Posted on: 25 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Ding Politik

I believe that scholars of anarchist theory have misunderstood the innovation of post-anarchist theory. Post-anarchism began as a critique of some of the presuppositions of traditional anarchist thought, specifically its ontological and epistemological positions. It was at its most powerful when it critiqued these assumptions. Its secondary benefit was to offer new possibilities for thinking anarchist ontology and, consequently, politics. Those who promote post-anarchist scholarship for only its secondary benefit therefore miss the important ‘break’ that it introduced into traditional theory. It is the break – or what Lacanians refer to as the ‘interpretative cut’ – that was most important, and not its secondary ontological and epistemological position.

A Response to “Beyond Bash the Fash”

  • Posted on: 22 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

originally published on It's Going Down

This is a response to the IGD podcast, “Beyond Bash the Fash.” I want to state clearly that I encourage people to listen to the podcast and I not only enjoyed the discussion which I felt was done in good faith, but took away a lot from it. The discussion itself is an important one, and having critical reflections about our activity is needed. Despite certain things in the discussion that were said that I disagreed with, overall I thought that those talking were generally respectful of people putting themselves on the front lines and risking life and limb to confront the far-Right, and that their points of critique should be viewed as part of an ongoing conversation, not a line in the sand

An Attack on All of Us

  • Posted on: 15 June 2017
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

How the Right Hopes to Use the Shooting in Alexandria

Those who wish to carry out acts of violence always seek to frame themselves as victims. If they are perceived as victims, this can legitimize the violence they perpetrate, or at least distract from it. So it was a godsend for the far right when James Hodgkinson opened fire in Alexandria on June 14, wounding House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and four other people. It gave them a chance to turn the story around: suddenly “Leftists” were the violent ones. Never mind the millions imprisoned and deported under Scalise’s governance, never mind the police murdering a thousand people a year, never mind the Republicans’ effort to deny tens of millions access to health care, never mind the white supremacist mass murders and stabbings and threats all around the US—those are so normalized as to barely warrant a mention. Yet a single shooting and a Shakespeare production, and suddenly everyone wants to talk about “left-wing violence.”

The First International and the Development of Anarchism and Marxism

  • Posted on: 15 June 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From Anarkismo by Wayne Price

Anarchism originated in the 1st International, through the Marx-Bakunin split.

There are recent histories of the First International researched from anarchist perspectives, which balance the dominant Marxist narrative. Both sides had their strengths and weaknesses, but overall the anarchists had the better program.

Anarchy Vs Yoga

  • Posted on: 14 June 2017
  • By: Fauve Noir

Have we just got gently fucked by Yoga, and its evermore affluent soft power?

The biggest and most successful cult these days, next to Capital of course, is Yoga. Yoga isn't only practice, but religion on its own... carrying a set of values, behavioral principles, representations about the Self and the Other, and also a very obvious set of metaphysical beliefs.

Pages