Essays

Anarchist Perspective on Mass Prisoner Resistance Movements

  • Posted on: 28 May 2015
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

There is a widespread, growing and committed resistance movement happening in US prisons across the nation. This movement is not going away, and with more outside support and national coordination, it could be powerful enough to reshape not only the US prison system, but the entire society.

Response to recent sHellNo! activist direct actions in PNW

  • Posted on: 28 May 2015
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Environmental activists have been taking more risks in attacking the root causes of climate change. From the #ShellNo protests in Seattle to the recent lock-down In Bellingham, WA where activists chained themselves to a #ShellOil support vessel set to leave the marine waters for Alaska oil drilling, direct action in the Pacific Northwest is alive and well.

Here we go Again - Issue 3

  • Posted on: 28 May 2015
  • By: worker

From Linchpin

Thanks for picking up the third volume of Mortar, Common Cause’s journal of revolutionary anarchist theory. In our two previous journals, the article topics that we chose to explore and expound upon were, more often than not, grounded in our own direct experiences, such as organizing in our neighbourhoods against gentrification, navigating the dynamics of Left/activist spaces, and confronting sexual violence.

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?

  • Posted on: 27 May 2015
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From The Implicit & Experiential Rantings of a Person

There has been an ongoing debate, or controversy (depending on one's frame of mind), that I have been aware of pretty much the entire time that I have been an anarchist, and at various points it has even had some big effects on my own life. I am referring here to the infamous debate between the “anarcho-capitalists” and the “regular” anti-capitalist anarchists.

The Slave Syndrome

  • Posted on: 25 May 2015
  • By: jmcquinn
Modern Slaves

From Modern Slavery

In the 1979 robbery of Kreditbanken at Norrmalmstorg – a square in Stockholm, Sweden – several bank employees were held hostage in the bank vault for most of a week during which time they began to increasingly identify with their captors. While their captors were under seige by police, the hostages went on to reject assistance from government agents. And after the captors were themselves captured by police the former hostages defended them. This example of abused victims becoming emotionally attached to their captors has since become widely known as the Stockholm Syndrome. It has been widely reported, studied and theorized to the point where it has nearly become a sociological cliché.

Pages