Essays

The loneliness of the crowd

  • Posted on: 13 November 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From 325

‘The loneliness of the crowd’ – Another reflection on the events at this year’s London Anarchist Bookfair (UK)

Anarchists are no strangers to conflict or violence. Yet we feel that the way the conflict unfolded at this year’s London Anarchist Bookfair was deeply disturbing and should have nothing to do with anarchism. The organising collective have, as a result of events on the day and subsequent reactions, issued a statement announcing that they will not be doing a Bookfair again next year. What we would like to talk about here though is the worrying climate in which the events took place, and the dangers of dogmas in the anarchist milieu.

Insurrection Cannot Be Negotiated

  • Posted on: 12 November 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Mpalothia by Imprisoned Conspiracy of Cells of Fire FAI-IRF Member Panagiotis Argyrou

Time is the illness of reality. In prison, time seems to poison the atmosphere. The air thickens as though it is flooded with lead filings and each and every day our lungs are infested with this oxygen so toxic that it weighs on us again and again, more so with each passing day.

London Bookfair ‘won’t happen in 2018’

  • Posted on: 10 November 2017
  • By: thecollective

via Freedom News

Following a confrontation at this year’s London Anarchist Bookfair sparked by two people handing out anti-trans leaflets, and a subsequent online firestorm, the Bookfair organisers have released two statements on what happened, announcing they will not be holding one in 2018.

The decision ends a 34-year run for the event, which was the largest of its kind. The collective’s statement is reproduced below:

Anarchism through the Silver Screen

  • Posted on: 10 November 2017
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

Why Are Anarchists Suddenly Showing up in so many Korean Films?

This year, several major films from South Korea depict rebels or outright anarchists. Okja portrays the Animal Liberation Front; Anarchist from Colony tells the story of Park Yeol and Fumiko Kaneko, two anarchist nihilists who have become national heroes in Korea; A Taxi Driver dramatizes the Gwanju uprising of 1980. Why are anarchists suddenly appearing in Korean cinema? What’s the context behind these films? And how can they inform how we frame our own narratives in a time of resurgent nationalism and unrest?

Nicholas Apoifis, Anarchy in Athens: An Ethnography of Militancy, Emotions and Violence

  • Posted on: 10 November 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Review of
Nicholas Apoifis, Anarchy in Athens: An Ethnography of Militancy, Emotions and Violence (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2017)

In his Ph.D. thesis Anarchy in Athens: An Ethnography of Militancy, Emotions and Violence, the Australian sociologist Nicholas Apoifis has taken on one of the hottest topics in recent anarchist history, namely the anarchist movement of the Greek capital.

To a Trodden Pansy: Remembering Louis Lingg

  • Posted on: 9 November 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From Plain Words

Louis Lingg was born on September 9, 1864 in Mannheim, Germany. Early in his life, he began working as a carpenter, eventually involving himself in revolutionary struggles. His politicization compelled him to evade military service, so he fled Germany for Switzerland, only to be expelled in 1885. That summer, Lingg immigrated to the United States, settling in Chicago, one of the epicenters of the vibrant German-American anarchist movement.

Germany / Greece: Message from Rigaer Street Comrades in Berlin to the Insurrection Festival in Athens

  • Posted on: 9 November 2017
  • By: thecollective

via Insurrection News

Received on 09.11.17:

Greetings from Berlin to Athens

We, individuals and groups from the Rigaer Street, welcome the initiative, to start a discussion about an insurrection and fill it with experiences from the past, current theories and practical possibilities. This is how we understood the call for the Insurrection Festival in Athens.

Red and Black October: An Anarchist Perspective on the Russian Revolution for its 100th Anniversary

  • Posted on: 7 November 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Black Rose Anarchist Federation

A hundred years to the day that the Winter Palace fell in Petrograd—October 25 in the Julian calendar, November 7 in the Gregorian—we present an anarchist perspective on the Russian Revolution, which began in February 1917 with a mass-mobilization and mutiny that deposed Tsar Nicholas II. Though the Revolution contained an awesome amount of liberatory potential, as reflected in workers’ self-management and peasant land-seizures, it was fatally deviated by the authoritarian Bolshevik Party, which took power a hundred years ago today. Now, Russia has gone a century without a revolution. The world awaits a new one!

[Porto Alegre, Bra$il] “When anarchy disturbs” Library Kaos statement about the prosecution against anarchists

  • Posted on: 3 November 2017
  • By: thecollective

There are many things to say, but we will start with the most urgent. In the 25 of October began an anti-anarchist persecution against FAG [Gaucho Anarchist Federation] Parhesia institute, Pandorga squat and some individuals who had their spaces and houses raided by cops. If not all, probably a good part of the anarchist diversity was reached and several of them spoke firmly from their agreement against repression. And this is a fresh air that strengthens every one who feels sedition.

via A_N_A
translated by tormentasdefogo

Pages