books

Announcing the Boston Anarchist Bookfair on November 9th-10th.

  • Posted on: 3 August 2019
  • By: thecollective

From It's Going Down

Join anarchists and community members for two days of learning and organizing for a better Boston and a better world. Against a backdrop of a Trump presidency and polls showing historic levels of disgust with both the government and capitalism, anarchists are building toward a world without politicians or billionaires.

Occult Features of Anarchism, by Erica Laglisse

  • Posted on: 28 July 2019
  • By: thecollective

From USAPP– American Politics and Policy, book review

In Occult Features of Anarchism, with Attention to the Conspiracy of Kings and the Conspiracy of the PeoplesErica Laglisse challenges the assumption that rationality and secularism are at the centre of anarchism, instead showing how this is rooted in a disavowal of its roots in religious and occult thinking, with implications for how we view anarchism and conspiracy theories today. This is a rich work that confronts deep-seated contemporary questions about anarchism, conspiracy theories and the nature of knowledge, writes Bethan Johnson

Pioneers of British Anarchism: George Barrett

  • Posted on: 16 June 2019
  • By: thecollective

From Freedom News UK

To mark the launch of new Freedom Press title Our Masters Are Helpless, we will be publishing a number of historic reprints about historic anarchist figures from our 130-year store of articles, starting with the firebrand himself, George Barrett. Originally written in 1947, this essay by Mat Kavanagh (himself a figure of note) was part of a series which attempted to rescue British activists from the obscurity that seemed destined to be their lot in the aftermath of World War I and II.

The Balkan Anarchist Bookfair 2018 in Novi Sad, Serbia

  • Posted on: 21 May 2019
  • By: thecollective

From A-Radio Berlin [A-Radio in English]

The 12th Balkan Anarchist Bookfair took place in Novi Sad, Serbia from 28th to 30th of September, 2018. The Balkan. Every year the Balkan Anarchist Bookfair (BAB) takes place in a different city across the Balkans and is organized by a local collective with an aim to connect local, regional, as well as the international anarchist community.

A-Radio Berlin had the chance to talk with some of the organizers of this 12th BAB about the event, its trajectory and perspective for the future, as well as the experiences of anarchist organizing in Serbia and the Balkans.

Statement from Fédération Anarchiste (French-speaking Anarchist Federation)

  • Posted on: 5 May 2019
  • By: thecollective

From London Anarchist Federation

Re: Attack at Publico, bookshop of the Anarchist Federation in Paris

An anarchist comrade was violently attacked with a knife the afternoon of 2nd May 2019 in the FA bookshop Publico (Paris).

There is nothing to suggest the attack was targetting him in particular, but rather the organisation he represents and to which he belongs : the Fédération Anarchiste.

Primal Anarchy Podcast 18: Book Recommendations, Part 3

  • Posted on: 30 April 2019
  • By: thecollective

From Primal Anarchy by Kevin Tucker

The trilogy of book recommendations finally concludes. Wild Resistance no 6 is finally out now, plus information on issue no 7 and call for papers. The heavily revised and expanded second edition of For Wildness and Anarchy is nearly done, hopefully will be printer bound within the next few months. Fiction book recommendations, and a reason for the lack thereof. Reader requests: US history recommendations and kid’s book. A plug for Gathered Remains and Cull of Personality. History recommendations. Thoughts on a couple key (or not) anarchist books. And then a quick run through of the massive world of anthropological book recommendations: cultural anthropology, overviews, ethnographies, ethnohistory, and anthropological looks at war.

No Wall They Can Build, Episode 1: Introduction

  • Posted on: 7 April 2019
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

Listen here. The Ex-Worker Podcast Collective is kicking off the serialized release of our first full audiobook, No Wall They Can Build: A Guide to Borders and Migration Across North America. We’ve divided this riveting first person account of life and death in the borderlands into eleven chapters, and over the next three months, we’ll be releasing them in weekly installments each Wednesday. Today, you’ll hear Episode 1: Introduction, which describes how the book was written by a solidarity worker along the US/Mexico border over years of trials and tribulations, and lays out a basic framework for understanding the global apartheid enforced by the border regime. You’ll hear a heartbreaking story about the brutality of migrant detention, and an inspiring one about surviving the journey north against all odds. This episode sets the stage for the in-depth analysis and longer stories of the chapters to come.

Blumenfeld’s Stirner

  • Posted on: 24 March 2019
  • By: thecollective

From The Anvil Review

All Things Are Nothing to Me is one of the latest books to emerge from the ongoing revival of interest in the work of Max Stirner. The title is taken from the opening line of the first English translation of Stirner’s The Unique and its Property, which can also be translated literally but more prosaically as “I have based my affair on nothing.” In his introduction, the author, Jacob Blumenfeld, says that his intention is to “reconstruct” Stirner’s unique philosophy1 and show a “contemporary, critical, and useful Stirner”. This already makes the book ambitious, as Stirner is all too often reduced to merely a meme or a punchline by both his detractors and his champions. Blumenfeld acknowledges this, considering and rejecting Stirner as a precursor to the troll culture of the alt-right as well as a would-be accommodator of the neoliberal status quo. Instead, he prefers to see Stirner as a kindred spirit of the notorious Invisible Committee, as both offer critiques of ideology and alienation. As he wraps up his introduction, Blumenfeld says that in the first chapter of his book he “discover[s] something interesting, namely, that one does not need the concept of the ‘ego’ to understand Stirner at all. In fact, this might have been the biggest stumbling block toward understanding his philosophy.”

Pages