capitalism

Friendship is a root of freedom

  • Posted on: 13 December 2017
  • By: thecollective

from https://joyfulmilitancy.com

To become what we need to each other, and to find power in friendship, is to become dangerous.

–anonymous [1]

I have a circle of friends and family with whom I am radically vulnerable and trust deeply – we call it coevolution through friendship.

–adrienne maree brown [2]

How to Stop a Flood

  • Posted on: 4 December 2017
  • By: thecollective

via gods and radicals

It was a long day at work, a long week. You were so tired this morning you left your phone at home, too, so there was nothing to help distract you from how much you hate your job.

But it’s Friday, and you’re done for the week. You can breathe a little, maybe even go have a drink with friends.

You arrive home. You climb the steps to your apartment building. Some days, those two flights to your apartment seem daunting. Today’s one of those days.

Q: What to do?

  • Posted on: 24 March 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)
blog post

“What should we do then? What’s your proposal?” These are questions I always hear from people.

A lot of people get stuck in this mindset. It can be a dangerous one. Sometimes, our anger and frustration leads us to do things in ways that don’t make any sense from more sober perspectives. Sometimes our eagerness for action leads us to ignore theory.

Topic of the Week: Prosumer Politics

  • Posted on: 15 August 2016
  • By: thecollective

The notion that we are living in a Consumer Society has been a fundamental piece of post-1950s social theory. This has been the case for anarchists and other anti-authoritarians/anti-capitalists; but it has also been the case for neo-Conservatives and other right-wingers who blame the Consumer Society for cultural decadence, moral relativism, etc.

Squatters occupy former Royal Mint building in Tower Hill

  • Posted on: 29 December 2015
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

Yesterday squatters occupied a former Royal Mint building in Tower Hill in protest against homelessness, empty buildings and the ongoing criminalisation of squatting.

The building on Royal Mint Court was converted into offices in 1980, when the Royal Mint completed its move to Llantrisant in Wales. At its height, the building symbolised the monetary power of the City of London and, as its occupiers point out, has become to represent the vast inequality it once had a part in producing.

Pages