gentrification

Anarchy in the Streets of Philadelphia

In Philadelphia, radical politics seem to have allowed radical leftists to destroy property with impunity. Mr. Feibush says Philadelphia police have dutifully investigated the property crimes against him and his business, but to his knowledge no one has been charged or prosecuted: “The feedback I receive is they can send over [the evidence] they have, but they don’t believe the DA’s office will prosecute.” Mr. Krasner’s office, he says, harbors an “unwillingness to do anything to these groups.” As a result, “they’ve clearly become more and more emboldened over the years.”

The Miraculous North East Militia

From The Transmetropolitan Review

Just northeast of downtown Los Angeles is the neighborhood of Highland Park, currently the target of blatant gentrification. According to most people, the completion of the Metro Gold Line in 2003 was the first step in this process, although it took years to feel the effects. Few people rode the Metro into the Highland Park station and most commuters just went between downtown and the end of the line. After the economic recession hit in 2008, the gentrification of Highland Park truly began, just as it did in a dozen other major cities.

The Hollowing of Anarchy: Gentrification

From scholium

Anarchy can differ from other anti-capitalist ideologies in being a lived practice. If anarchy is the end goal, then it must be the means as well. This often turns out looking like working as little as possible, living communally with friends, getting by using scams, and experimenting with social relationships. Unfortunately, these more interesting and liberating tendencies based in subverting daily life are receding as gentrification closes off possibilities for living cheap in the cities. What remains in the U.S. anarchist space is activism. Lacking this daily life component, anarchy slides back into leftism.

Subscribe to RSS - gentrification