magpie

Margaret Killjoy’s Danielle Cain books are razor-sharp anarchist urban fantasies

  • Posted on: 11 April 2018
  • By: thecollective

“Sometimes, you just have to get a knife in your hands and make it clear which way the stabby end is pointing.”

So begins Margaret Killjoy’s novella The Lamb Will Slaughter the Lion, the first of a pair of books that introduces a fantastic world of magic in America’s decrepit heartland, featuring a band of genderqueer, anarchist demon hunters. The two books are short, sharp, get straight to the point, and present a fantastic world that can be consumed in a single sitting.

I Won’t Lie to Anyone I Wouldn’t Punch

  • Posted on: 22 March 2018
  • By: thecollective

Violence is, at its core, about controlling other people. It’s perhaps the rawest expression of control. Pacifists have done an enormous amount of work detailing all the ways that violence wrecks havoc upon our society, and they only thing they’re wrong about is claiming that violence is, therefore, never justified.

Only Some Power Comes from the Barrel of a Gun

  • Posted on: 26 February 2018
  • By: thecollective

The students who are organizing against gun violence? I am excited to see them learn the power they can wield — because not all power comes from the barrel of the gun and the best forms of power never do. I hope they realize that they can push for changes that don’t just address gun ownership but also the ways in which those laws might be enforced; I hope they push for changes that don’t empower the police, but instead look to disempower nationalists and misogynists. I hope they see the problem of violence in our society is more than a single issue and that the gun issue itself as more than just black and white.

We Will Remember Freedom

  • Posted on: 25 January 2018
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From Crimethinc

Why It Matters that Ursula K. Le Guin Was an Anarchist

I’ve never liked the part of the story when the mentor figure dies and the young heroes say they aren’t ready to go it alone, that they still need her. I’ve never liked it because it felt clichéd and because I want to see intergenerational struggle better represented in fiction.

Today I don’t like that part of the story because… I don’t feel ready.