nature

Peculiar Mormyrid on Immediatism podcast

Immediatism is pleased to share three surrealist pieces from the magazine Peculiar Mormyrid. Minneapolis Athenor, the first piece, describes the insurrectionary response to George Floyd's murder. Our Game, the second piece, celebrates the patience of insurrectionary anarchists. The last text, Our World, the Dreamer, has an interesting take on the stance that people are not outside of Nature. Casi Cline claims that humans are cruel, foolish, and self-destructive because Nature is cruel, foolish, and self-destructive.

The Tamarix Project on Immediatism podcast

These two magical green anarchist pieces offer us ways to relate to our animated environment as powerful equals. In Tending the Body of the Goddess, we see that being stuck in grief for Nature can prevent us being a true partner to her. Freedom from grief allows us to flourish along with Nature. The second piece models a style of interaction with the undesirable thoughts that crowd our minds, whether nightmares or just civilization's intrusions; by calling the Night Mare to us, holding her, working with her, and then freeing her, we can become free of our nightmares. Both pieces are beautifully written and quite moving. Immediatism has received strong positive feedback on these. Check out The Tamarix Project, Backwoods Journal at LittleBlackCart.com, or Oak Journal for more like them.

If Lyobov's Notes Made It Back to Terra: Ursula K. LeGuin vs. Hollywood

Peter Gelderloos

In 2009, James Cameron made a remake of Dances With Wolves set on the fictitious planet of Pandora and replacing the Lakota with an alien species called the Na'vi. It ended up being far more successful than Edward Zwick's 2003 Dances With Wolves remake starring Tom Cruise, and even more than the Kevin Costner original.

Curiously, all the major elements of this remake that were different from the first Dances With Wolves were lifted from an Ursula K. LeGuin novel, The Word for World is Forest.

Subscribe to RSS - nature