relationships

TOTW: What do you say to non-anarchists?

  • Posted on: 21 August 2017
  • By: thecollective

How often do you talk to people who you disagree with? How do you talk to them? Are they people you've known for a long time, old friends who went in different directions from you, family members, co-workers/students, neighborhood folks? What have you noticed about how you relate to them, what you don't challenge--and what is that based on?

Suturing the Split: Coda on the Couple-Form

  • Posted on: 11 April 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Guts Magazine by Clémence x. Clémentine on November 25, 2016

We wrote “Against the Couple-Form” in 2010.
After some revisions, it appeared in 2012.
This text railed against every existing form of romantic coupling.
Which we considered a barrier to the triumph of a feminist revolution.
Since then, a number of things have happened.
Amongst us, between us, in the world.

Topic of the Week: dating...

  • Posted on: 10 April 2017
  • By: thecollective

It can be tricky finding compatibility in dating and relationships at the best of times. So how do anarchist views and ways affect these things, especially considering anarchists make up a tiny percentage of the overall population?

Does dating within established anarchist circles help? Or does this become stagnant at some point?

For people living outside major centres, how do you find people to date who are of like mind or even who are not hostile to your ways?

The Relational Anarchist Primer

  • Posted on: 16 February 2017
  • By: thecollective

From Psychologic Anarchist

“When you show deep empathy toward others, their defensive energy goes down, and positive energy replaces it. That’s when you can get more creative in solving problems.”

-Stephen Covey

Relational Anarchism is a standalone vector or field of thought under the umbrella of anarchism.

In this perspective, relationships determine levels of human freedom. The process of human interaction is more important than content.

Say It with Barricades

  • Posted on: 14 February 2017
  • By: thecollective

From CrimethInc.

What do anarchists mean when we talk about love? For some the word is inextricably associated with pacifism. Spiritual leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr. preached love and non-violence as one and the same. “Peace and love”—together, these words have become a mantra invoked to impose passivity on those who would stand up for themselves. But does love always mean peace? Do we need to throw out the one if we disagree tactically with the other? What does it mean for us to extol love in such a violent time, when more and more people are losing faith in nonviolence? What is actually at stake in embracing or rejecting the rhetoric of love?