religion

Maurin, Day, the Catholic Worker Group, and Anarcho-Distributism

  • Posted on: 11 July 2018
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)
Peter Maurin, Dorothy Day, Catholic Worker

By Nicholas Evans

Peter Maurin, Dorothy Day, and the Catholic Worker group are Christian Anarchists.

What sort of economy do they advocate?

Day who is one of the founders of the Catholic Worker group discussed a sort of Anarcho-Distributism.(also known as Anarcho-Distributivism) In actuality Anarcho-Distributism is very similar to the economics of Proudhon’s Mutualism.

TOTW: Religion and Spirituality

  • Posted on: 4 June 2018
  • By: thecollective

I had a good discussion with friends in Montreal this past weekend about the growth in people approaching anarchy through the lens of spirituality, and vice versa. From the burgeoning movement of Christian mystics and radicals through things like the Friendly Fire Collective (which often looks like the religion of struggle) to people engaging with gods and spirits older and younger, the rise in spiritual modes of anarchy is refreshing to me as a phenomenon which offers a challenge to those who “love to indulge in the spurious disagreeable and pointless exercise of ex-communicating the differently-faithed amongst their comrades”.

Anarchism and Catholicism: An Introduction

  • Posted on: 24 February 2018
  • By: thecollective

From Hampton Institution by Chase Padusniak

“Anarchy,” a scary word to many, doesn’t get much used in Catholic circles. It seems downright frightening, either theologically or personally—it seems to threaten longstanding traditions of justice, not to mention the personal comfort and status of the West’s largely comfortable and assimilated Catholic population. Witness, for example, the Catholic Encyclopedia:

In response to ‘The Religion of Green Anarchy’

  • Posted on: 26 August 2017
  • By: thecollective

From mtlcounter-info.org

In ‘The religion of green anarchy’, the author continually refers to their ideas of what “green anarchism” is about without referring to where exactly these ideas are stated. There is not a single quote from a green anarchist journal or book in the essay, nor is there any reference to what texts the author has or has not read dealing with green anarchy. If the author’s idea of green anarchy is based on conversations with individuals at land defense camps, it would be good to say so – in this case the critique becomes more about “how some people interpret green anarchy” then about green anarchy in its totality. This essay takes a large and complex tangle of ideas that have been evolving since at least the 80’s1, and simplifies them into a caricature (‘the morality of pure wilderness’) that neglects most of the theory that makes green anarchist thought and its associated currents worth reading in the first place. I would also suspect that this may be why Green and Black review did not respond to the essay.

Religion Used as Recuperative and Pacification Program

  • Posted on: 27 May 2017
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

by anarchist prisoner Michael Kimble

The ongoing recuperation and pacification program targeting rebellious prisoners here at Holman prison by the state and in collusion with outside religious ministries has prompted me to write about the absurdity of religion and the logic of submission it induces.

Most prisoners adopt some form of religious doctrine in the face of this unyielding onslaught against them by the criminal justice system in an attempt to make sense of the situation they find themselves in and in hopes that things will turn out in their favor, and as coping tools. Most have been socialized into religion before coming to prison, beginning as a small child. The pressures of poverty, oppression, and survival forced them to abandon ritualistic religion, but when they find themselves in prison, they revert back to their childhood religious instructions – that god has a purpose in life for them and to put their burdens in god’s hands because no one knows god’s design for the human being.

México: When Christmas starts, anarchy ends...

  • Posted on: 24 December 2016
  • By: Anonymous (not verified)

From contra info and translated to English by anonymous

It was only a few years ago, on December 13th, 2013, when some hooded ones burned the Christmas tree located on Avenida Reforma[1]. This action took place during manifestations against subway ticket hikes, that tragically ended between the reform and recuperation by NGO’s and governmental agencies of social welfare; however at the same time these occassions witnessed spontaneous actions, autonomous organization and sabotage from the oppressed and exploited. After this symbolic anti-capitalist act, one friend still remains in prison accused of setting the Christmas tree sponsored by Coca-Cola on fire. The -symbolic- burning of the tree from Coca-Cola, wasn’t just meant as an attack against the symbol of North American[2] capitalism, but also as an attack against the culture of consumerism, an attack against religious traditions imposed by those who believe they’re the owners of the world, an attack on patriarchy, against power and all religious and moral authority.

Pages