review

Book Review: Emma Goldman, ‘Mother Earth’ and the Anarchist Awakening

Book Review: Emma Goldman, ‘Mother Earth’ and the Anarchist Awakening

From Freedom News UK

It is hard not to feel some sympathy for Emma Goldman after her treatment at the hands of some historians and writers. All too often they have filleted her ideas to “prove” their pre-conceived thesis or simply failed to acknowledge the complexity of the “Light and Shadows” in her life that Candace Falk writes about in Volume Three of the Emma Goldman Papers.(“Light and Shadows, 1910-1916”. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2012) There is however some evidence that this situation is gradually being remedied beyond the work of The Emma Goldman Papers. Kathy Ferguson’s “Emma Goldman: Political Thinking In The Streets” (London: Rowan and Littlefield, 2011) accepts the underlying principles of the anarchism that drove Goldman and her comrades and discusses how Goldman attempted to make these ideas and principles a reality. Now this important and essential volume by Rachel Hsu goes back to the primary sources in an attempt to allow the ideas and actions of Goldman to speak for themselves. It is a timely reminder that Goldman is her own person with all that entails and not just an inspiring quote on facebook, usually taken out of context.

Price on Blumenfeld

Price on Blumenfeld

From H-Socialisms by Wayne Price

'All Things Are Nothing to Me: The Unique Philosophy of Max Stirner'

Max Stirner was the pen name of Johann Kasper Schmidt (1806-56). He was part of a milieu of young philosophers who sought to develop further the philosophy of the great German thinker Georg W. F. Hegel, who had died in 1831. This milieu has been referred to as the Young Hegelians or Left Hegelians. While Hegel’s system had solidified into a reactionary form, they mainly tried to rework it in more humanistic, naturalistic, and democratic directions. The most well-known of these young men today (there were women in the grouping, but their names have dropped out of history) are Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. (Engels had been a personal friend of Stirner’s for a time.) Michael Bakunin—later a founder of revolutionary socialist-anarchism—also studied Hegel and was in contact with this milieu.

Announcing Fifth Estate #408, Winter 2021

reading books!

From Fifth Estate

Announcing new issue of Fifth Estate, The Anarchist Review of Books special edition.

&

FIFTH ESTATE LIVE! Fifth Estate Anarchist Review of Books | Tuesday, December 15, 1 p.m. Eastern
David Rovics hosts the FE Anarchist Review of Books crew for a roll-out of this special edition. Join him as he talks with writers and editors of the issue
https://www.fifthestate.org/archive/fe-live/

TOTW: 2020 - The year past, the year ahead

all my friends are sinking beneath the waves

Topic of the week - As 2020 comes to a close, let’s take a look back at the ongoing social upheavals worldwide, the inspiring international anarchist actions, some books that have kept you turning the pages, and the music that has been the soundtrack to it all. 2020 has been a year, to say the least.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on Anarchists

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on Anarchists: Review of “The Gulag Archipelago”

From Industrial Worker by Raymond S. Solomon

Review of “The Gulag Archipelago”

Who were the most dedicated, active, and long-suffering revolutionaries in Czarist Russia? In his epic history, The Gulag Archipelago, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn says that it was the Socialist Revolutionaries and the Anarchists who were imprisoned the most, had the most people serving hard labor, and the most people imprisoned by the Czarist regime—many multiple the times of the Social Democrats, from which both the Bolshevik and Menshevik emerged. It was mostly Socialists Revolutionaries (SR) and the Anarchists who received the worst sentences in Czarist Russia. The Anarchists and the Socialist Revolutionaries were very similar, although not identical, ideologically. What was the reward the Anarchists and Socialist Revolutionaries received for this labor, fighting, dedication, and death?

Book Review: Great Anarchists

from Center for a Stateless Society

Book Review: Ruth Kinna and Clifford Harper. Great Anarchists (London: Dog Section Press, 2020)

by Kevin Carson

Written by anarchist scholar Ruth Kinna professor of Political Theory at Loughborough University and editor of Anarchist Studies and illustrated by Ralph Harper (most famous for the illustrations in Radical Technology, this book is a collection of essays on ten anarchists that were originally published as stand-alone pamphlets.

Great Anarchists | Review

Great Anarchists | Review

From Organise Magazine

Anarchism, despite being a rich historical tradition with theorists and thinkers from all over the world, and which has influenced a great many social movements, is unfairly maligned at times. Some pigeon hole it as an anachronism, based on the worship of a prelapsarian past; a mindset of the small-society and essentially obsolete today. Others malign it as overtly and centrally European, unequipped to deal with the struggles faced by people of colour and colonised peoples today who may demand a nationalism of their own for the sake of safety. Beyond this, some – often of the more traditionally Marxist stripe – tend to label it utopian and divorced from material change: too busy focused on what could be to deal with what is.

Out of the Ruins: An Anarchist Studies Journal Review

From PM Press

By Judith Suissa
Anarchist Studies Journal
March 2020

As Robert Haworth notes in his introduction to this volume,
there is a rich tradition of anarchist criticism of state schooling
as one of the institutions that ‘uphold and reinforce’ a
particular set of social, political, economic and cultural ideas
(p6). This collection of work by educational activists, theorists
and practitioners promises to document and explore the
‘radical learning spaces’ emerging as alternatives to the
social imaginaries of formal state schooling.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - review