work

The Anarchist in the Cancer Center

  • Posted on: 17 November 2019
  • By: thecollective
The Anarchist in the Cancer Center

From Bad News Press by Joe Peacott

There are certainly frustrations associated with being an anarchist and working as a nurse.  The entire health care system, like the rest of society, is riddled with authoritarian relationships, corporate penny-pinching and profit-taking, and intrusive government regulations.  The state believes that individuals are not capable of taking care of themselves so it requires licensing of healthcare providers and institutions and prevents people from purchasing most drugs without a doctor’s note.  Besides restricting the number of health care providers and limiting people’s choices in seeking treatment, licensing and prescribing laws institutionalize the hierarchical relationships between doctors and nurses, nurses and patient care techs, and, perhaps most importantly, between those providing care and those receiving it.

Precursors of Syndicalism IV

  • Posted on: 19 October 2019
  • By: thecollective
Precursors of Syndicalism IV

From Anarchist Writers by anarcho

In previous instalments of this series, we have discussed syndicalist ideas in the First International (Precursors of Syndicalism I), before turning to International Working People’s Association (Precursors of Syndicalism II) and communist-anarchism (Precursors of Syndicalism III). Here, we highlight anarchist-communist criticisms of revolutionary syndicalism.

Prison Jobs are Racist: a Labor Day Reportback

  • Posted on: 5 September 2019
  • By: anon (not verified)
Composite of three pictures: first depicting a black man in shorts holding a poster that reads "prison jobs are racist". Center photo is two white bicyclists holding posters that say "prison jobs are wasteful" and "prison jobs are corrupt". The third photo is of a black houseless man holding a poster that says "prison jobs are racist".

some MKE anarchists

Ten minutes before the Labor Day parade in Milwaukee WI, a group of jubilant anarchist trouble-makers walked the route with posters calling out AFSCME, the union that includes prison guards. This union relies on dues from, supports, and seeks to expand state jobs, including the toxic job screws do.

An Anarchist Case for UBI

  • Posted on: 25 April 2019
  • By: thecollective

From C4SS by Logan Marie Glitterbomb

Universal Basic Income (UBI) is quickly becoming a hot topic this presidential cycle due to the likes of Andrew Yang and his supporters. Since he began his campaign, many other candidates have been interrogated about their support for the idea and more and more are responding positively, even if half-heartedly. Sadly some, such as Bernie Sanders, have remained skeptical of such a program and have instead called for measures such as a higher minimum wage and a federal jobs guarantee. Such solutions are rooted in backwards economic thinking and only serve to tie us further to the current state-capitalist system. A UBI, however, would offer us much more freedom from economic oppression and state bureaucracy while possibly paving the way for us to build an economic situation that is far better than what we have now.

Tags: 

Organizing in the Bad Old Days: The Harvest Collective drive, 1998-1999

  • Posted on: 21 February 2019
  • By: thecollective

From organizing.work

Patrick McGuire recounts an organizing drive at a grocery coop in Winnipeg in the late 1990s, before the IWW developed its Organizer Training program.

I went to a Propagandhi concert in 1993 and decided to become a vegan. After becoming a vegan, I needed to find tofu, soymilk and lentils, so I started shopping at Harvest Collective. Harvest was a natural and organic food consumer co-op that had operated in the Wolseley neighbourhood (or the Granola Belt) of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada for about 20 years. The store was ridiculously small, crowded and always had some weird scent that I couldn’t quite place. Due to its relative longevity and success, a second location was opened across the Assiniboine river on Corydon Ave in the Little Italy district. Originally, this breakaway shop was a separate consumer co-op called Sunflower, but, due to poor management, it was eventually acquired by the original Harvest Collective. These two stores would come to be the first workplaces ever organized into the IWW and certified by the Manitoba Labour Relations Board in the history of our prairie province.