Who do the passionate communards work for?

une pétroleuse

via Anarquía, translation by Anarchist News

"I will then become a worker: such is the idea that stops me, when the mad rages push me towards the battle of Paris - where, however, so many workers continue to die while I write to you! Work now, never again." 1 Rimbaud

Since 1871 - the year in which the "accursed poet" wrote this letter - it was not necessary to be a "seer" to see the obvious: the masses of workers who fought on the barricades in Paris continued to work. That "wildcat strike" in front of the Versailles authority was, in turn, a new job that produced new obligations and condemned them to perpetuate work in saecula saeculorum. Such deep reflection, in the midst of a necromancing trance, probably prompted Rimbaud to question: who were the passionate communards working for? prophesying a system of domination based on direct democracy as the axis of political-social management, which ensured the permanence of authority and continuity of work.

Backwoods 3: Call for submissions

Backwoods, volume 3 - call for submissions

It has been our great pleasure to renew and recreate Backwoods as a new editorial team, after unexpected life circumstances unrelated to the project caused two among the first group of editors to leave the journal one at a time after the first two issues. The new group has made a joint decision to release larger (150 - 250-page) volumes on an irregular schedule, whenever we have a suite of content with which we are happy.

The Truth about “The Truth about Today’s Anarchists”

(A-Radio) B(A)D NEWS – Angry voices from around the world – Episode 38 (09/2020)

You can find episode number 38 (09/2020) of international news show "B(A)D NEWS - Angry voices from around the world" at A-Radio Berlin's new website or on the website of the International Network of Anarchist and Antiauthoritarian Radio Projects.

Gender and Classes

from incendo.noblogs.org

Incendo was a communist magazine and a group based in Avignon, in south-eastern France, active from 2007 to 2012. It published five issues of this journal and, at the end, a special « Gender and Classes » issue which included several articles on domestic work, the family or the French women liberation movement in the 1970’s. This first article, extracted from this issue, was presented as follows: “This text presents the current state of our reflections on the question of the relationship between genres genders and classes. It is also an attempt to synthesize the other articles and texts of this issue of Incendo. It therefore has nothing static or definitive and should be seen as a contribution to a necessary debate.”. Debate indeed there was. The paper version of this text circulated a lot in France in 2012, mainly in anarchist, ultra-left or autonomous circles, which triggered lively debate, much controversy, and resulted in responses being written. Here is the first English translation.

Desert on Immediatism Podcast

Desert is now available as a series of ten podcast episodes at Immediatism.com. This is necessary reading/listening on green anarchism, from its wealth of anarchist perspectival information on global warming and exactly what to expect in the coming years, to its insurrectionary conclusion. I have attempted to represent a sampling of the extensive and fascinating endnotes within some of the episode introductions, but for the full 36 pages of endnotes, pick up a copy of Desert from LittleBlackCart.com, available with your choice of two cover designs.

The Truth About Today’s Anarchists

Jeremy Lee Quinn has spent the past four months marching and documenting “black bloc” anarchists in half a dozen cities across the country.

via The New York Times

That’s the thing about “insurrectionary anarchists.” They make fickle allies. If they help you get into power, they will try to oust you the following day, since power is what they are against. Many of them don’t even vote. They are experts at unraveling an old order but considerably less skilled at building a new one. That’s why, even after more than 100 days of protest in Portland, activists do not agree on a set of common policy goals.

What’s So Bad About Anarchy, Anyway?

A march through the Capitol Hill Organized Protest in Seattle on June 24.

via Slate

With Trump attacking “anarchist jurisdictions,” a scholar of anarchism discusses the use and misuse of the A-word.

By Joshua Keating

Anarchism is having a moment—or at least the word is. President Donald Trump spent much of the summer blaming violence at protests around the country on “radical-left anarchists.” His election rival, Joe Biden, has made clear that while he supports peaceful protests, he strongly opposes “anarchists” as well. Some of Trump’s critics have suggested that with his disregard for the norms and institutions of American politics, he’s the real anarchist.

Why Anarchism is Dangerous

via Anarchist Agency

By Dana Ward and Paul Messersmith-Glavin

Anarchists frighten privileged elites and their authoritarian followers not simply because the primary goals of the movement have been to abolish the sources of elite power – the state, patriarchy, and capitalism – but because anarchism offers a viable alternative form of social and political organization grounded in workplace collectives, neighborhood assemblies, bottom-up federations, child-centered free schools, and a variety of cultural organizations operating on the basis of cooperation, solidarity, mutual aid, and direct, participatory democracy.

Bombs for Confindustria Brescia & Prison Guards

via Round Robin

Italy: Two parcel bombs for the President of Confindustria Brescia and the Prison Guard’s Union

We sent two parcel bombs to the president of Confindustria Brescia, Giuseppe Pasini and SAPPE of Modena.
We hit the unions of the bosses and their minions.
We hit the corporate and prison slaughterers in the first days of the proclamation of the state of emergency. In front of the images of the bodies taken away by military means we understood: Your death, my death. Capitalism is a rotting corpse: Let’s bury it.

People Don’t Need Permission to Feed Each Other

from Inhabit: Territories

“The People Don’t Need Permission to Feed Each Other”

Santiago de Chile’s community kitchens amid the pandemic and uprising

Written by Benito Brava

As a result of the October 2019 uprising, millions of Chileans have reconceptualized what it means to live and to fight. A new generation of frontliners has emerged as protesters learn to carve out territories for unauthorized public activities and defend them against the police.

Pages

Subscribe to anarchistnews.org RSS